Taxes take more than food and clothing combined from U.S. households

  • 1 September 2017
  • NormanL
The tax bite keeps getting bigger

With the President making his push for tax reform this week, a natural question to ask is: just how much do folks pay in taxes, anyway? According to this piece, more than you think:

Americans on average spent more on taxes in 2016 than they did on food and clothing combined, according to data released this week by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The same data also shows that in three years—from 2013 to 2016—the average tax bill for Americans increased 41.13 percent.

In 2016, according to BLS, “consumer units” (which include families, financially independent individuals, and people living in a single household who share expenses) spent more on average on federal, state and local taxes ($10,489) than they did on food ($7,203) and clothing ($1,803) combined ($9,006).

The average tax bill for American “consumer units” increased from $7,423 in 2013 to $10,489 in 2016, according to data released this week by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The tax-and-spending data was collected as part of the BLS’s Consumer Expenditure Survey, which is conducted for the BLS by the Census Bureau. The survey measures the expenditures and incomes of American consumers.

That's fairly shocking. The only item Americans spent more on each year was housing. But given time, and minus any reform in the tax code and Washington's spending habits, it won't be long before taxes consume everything else in the average household budget.

All the more reason for Congress to find its spine, and get to work cutting taxes.

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